Art Scene :: Reno

August 23, 2016 Art, Blog, Uncategorized 11 Comments

Who would have guessed that downtown Reno has more to offer than casinos!
Since our plane arrived several hours before our hosts were due home, we opted to cruise Reno to bide the time. Thanks to Yelp, we found the Nevada Museum of Art.

You can’t judge a museum by its building.
It’s sleek, modern exterior and sculptures led me to expect nothing but modern art on display. Nevada Museum of Art Sculpture

Although there was a hall of modern art and sculptures, we were pleasantly surprised to happen upon their extensive American Impressionism: The Lure of the Artists’ Colony exhibit. Today was the final day. We caught it just in time.

After paying the entrance fee at the front desk, I noticed brunch was being served while a musician played soft jazz in their delightful cafe. Glass walls of the cafe framed beautiful views of a native plant garden just outside. We enjoyed listening to the live music while perusing their gift shop and bookstore, next to the cafe. Strolling upstairs we easily found the exhibit which was housed in a number of airy rooms and walkways.

Below are highlights from the show.

I was excited to see a work by renown impressionist artist and teacher, Charles Webster Hawthorne! His dedication to teacher William Merritt Chase can be seen in the lower left corner of his painting, “A Study in White”. While teaching my art classes, I find myself referring to a paperback compilation of Hawthorne’s teaching notes. Seeing an original Hawthorne up close was a real treat.

1900 Oil on canvas Charles Webster Hawthorne

A Study in White, circa 1900 Oil on canvas Charles Webster Hawthorne

Charles Webster Hawthorne's Dedication to William Merritt Chase

Charles Webster Hawthorne’s Dedication to William Merritt Chase

It seemed only appropriate to find on display nearby, none other than William Merritt Chase’s paint brush and palette.

William Merritt Chase's Paintbrush

William Merritt Chase’s Paintbrush

William Merritt Chase's Palette

William Merritt Chase’s Palette

Speaking of treats, we spied works by John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt that we hadn’t seen in any gallery or museum before.

Man Reading, circa 1904-08 Oil on canvas John Singer Sargent

Man Reading, circa 1904-08 Oil on canvas John Singer Sargent

Close up of John Singer Sargent's "Man Reading"

Close up of John Singer Sargent’s “Man Reading”

Margot Wearing a Bonnet circa 1902 Color drypoint etching Mary Stevenson Cassatt

Margot Wearing a Bonnet circa 1902 Color drypoint etching Mary Stevenson Cassatt

It was spooky to see the very place where Barry and I were married, the El Encanto, Santa Barbara painted by Colin Campbell Cooper, circa 1921-1922.

The Lotus Pool, El Encanco, Santa Barbara circa 1921-22 Oil on canvas Colin Campbell Cooper

The Lotus Pool, El Encanco, Santa Barbara circa 1921-22 Oil on canvas Colin Campbell Cooper

Luminous skin tones always amaze me. William McGregor Paxton‘s “Girl with a Hand Mirror” and Lazar Raditz‘ “Portrait of Mrs. Lazar Raditz” both caught my attention.

Girl with a Hand Mirror, William McGregor Paxton

Girl with a Hand Mirror circa 1915 Oil on canvas William McGregor Paxton

Close up of William McGregor Paxton's Girl with a Hand Mirror

Close up of William McGregor Paxton’s Girl with a Hand Mirror

Close up of William McGregor Paxton's Girl with a Hand Mirror

Close up of William McGregor Paxton’s Girl with a Hand Mirror

Portrait of Mrs. Lazar Raditz, Lazar Raditz

Portrait of Mrs. Lazar Raditz circa 1918 Oil on canvas Lazar Raditz

Close-up of Portrait of Lazar Raditz' Mrs. Lazar Raditz,

Close-up of Portrait of Lazar Raditz’ Mrs. Lazar Raditz,

My hubby on the other hand, is smitten by stunning landscapes, especially oversized works. Charles Paul Gruppe‘s “Homeward Way” and Frederick John Mulhaupt’s “February Sun” did not disappoint.

Homeward Way, Charles Paul Gruppe

Homeward Way circa 1900 Oil on canvas Charles Paul Gruppe

February's Sun, Frederick John Mulhaupt

February’s Sun circa 1930s Oil on Canvas Frederick John Mulhaupt

Whenever we think we’ve seen enough of seascapes, a few captivate our attention and we find ourselves staring in awe. That’s what happened when we viewed these seascapes by Frank Cuprien and Richard Blossom Farley.

Evening Sun, Frank Cuprien

Evening Sun circa 1925 Oil on canvas Frank Cuprien

Passing Cloud, Richard Blossom Farley

Passing Cloud circa 1919 Oil on canvas Richard Blossom Farley

Last but not least, Ben Foster‘s “Corn Stalks and Pumpkins” caught my eye. It eerily reminded me of a chalk pastel pumpkin patch study I had painted over a decade ago using the identical green and orange palette. Fun!

Corn Stalks and Pumpkins, Ben Foster

Corn Stalks and Pumpkins circa 1910-20 Oil on canvas Benjamin (Ben) Foster

The exhibit had so many more paintings than I could cover in this blog. To view and learn more about this inspiring exhibit, visit American Impressionism: The Lure of the Artists’ Colony. Which ones did you like best?

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